The 5 best and not so well-known Argentine writers

The best and not so well-known Argentine writers: yes, we know Cortazar, Borges, Sabato, Arlt, Bioy Casares. But, what about the others? What about those who did not have the fame and prestige in their time.

Here is a list for you. Now you can google them and forget about going out tonight. The 5 best and not so well-known Argentine writers

  1. José Sbarra. José Sbarra (Buenos Aires, July 15, 1950 – August 23, 1996) was a writer, theater author, poet and Argentine screenwriter. Initially author of several books for children and young people, then changing the nuance of his poetic prose, with a style that combined the sordid, the delirious and the playful. Among his best known works are Obsesión de Vivir, Marc, la sucia rata and Plástico Cruel. Sbarra wrote novels and poems, all set in sordid places, with sordid characters, disenchanted, abandoned, marginalized. His vision that life could not be this, that this could not be life, that it was all a deception, went through all his work. Very important for the queer culture in Argentina, Sbarra introduced the LGBT community into protagonist roles in their stories. He died young and his work was not decently edited until a few years ago. Now you can buy his books, see his works in theater under and attend poetry recitals where his poems are read. Maybe too late, now Sbarra did get the recognition he deserved.

  2. Ioshua (Josue Marcos Belmonte) Ioshua was a poet, writer, performer, draftsman, musician, Dj. He lived in the suburbs of Buenos Aires, was the victim of family violence by his father and his brands were left for life. Pain, but also love, go through his work. Build a world of love, drugs, friends, reality, street culture. The bicycle, the joint, the beer, the lack of love. He edited his own works, he drew, he made fanzines. He was a queer militant and a very important loss for the under culture. He died very young, at 37, surrounded by his paintings and his works. You can read his works at http://pijabirrafaso.blogspot.com.ar/

  3. Vicente Luy. Originally from Córdoba, Vicente Luy committed suicide at the age of 51 in the province of Salta, throwing himself from the top of a building. He was hospitalized in a psychiatric hospital for a while. His poetry marked a generation of poets. “By breaking the rules Adam was thrown out of paradise. I claim that. What kind of Eden is that, that there are things that can not be done? ” labeled controversial, he was accused of wallpapering the city with a photo of him naked. He lived a life told by anecdotes of friends, his writing, his customs and his fears are reflected in his work.

  4. Macky Corbalán. Macky Corbalán was born on June 19, 1963 in Cutral Co. She was a journalist and licensed in social service. Active militant of feminism and lesbianism. He cultivated one of the most original poetic voices of the region and the country. He died on September 14, 2014.

    “Poetry is always against power … to be a poet is to be a dissident”

    “If poetry is living, if you write, it’s a great bonus, but if you do not write, you’re still a poet”

    You can read his work here: http://pasajeradearena.blogspot.com/

  5. Néstor Perlongher. Néstor Perlongher (December 25, 1949 in Avellaneda, province of Buenos Aires – November 26, 1992 in San Pablo, Brazil) was an Argentine LGBT poet, writer and militant based in Brazil since 1982. He was one of the founders and main reference of the Homosexual Liberation Front in Argentina, one of the first LGBT organizations in the world. “We do not want them to persecute us, to take us, or to discriminate against us, or to kill us, or to be cured, or analyzed, or explained, or tolerated, or understood: what we want is that they want us. ” “Néstor Perlongher was an insatiable writer, he created his own style that he nicknamed” neobarroso “, in which he met contradictorily the baroque loops and the silver mud: that is, he himself … the figure of Néstor Perlongher was growing bigger than ever. so that at this height appears as one of the most necessary voices of the last Argentine poetry “(A.Schettini, La Nación)

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Wanderlust was my second home during my 5 months living in Buenos Aires. I got to know Argentina through this amazing school and experiences while studying with my professor, Vicky.

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